Effects of weighted vests on attention, impulse control, and on-task behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Am J Occup Ther. Mar-Apr 2014;68(2):149-58. doi: 10.5014/ajot.2014.009365.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of using weighted vests for improving attention, impulse control, and on-task behavior in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHOD. In a randomized, two-period crossover design, 110 children with ADHD were measured using the Conners' Continuous Performance Test-II (CPT-II) task. RESULTS. In the weighted vest condition, the participants did show significant improvement in all three attentional variables of the CPT-II task, including inattention; speed of processing and responding; consistency of executive management; and three of four on-task behaviors, including off task, out of seat, and fidgets. No significant improvements in impulse control and automatic vocalizations were found. CONCLUSION. Although wearing a weighted vest is not a cure-all strategy, our findings support the use of the weighted vest to remedy attentional and on-task behavioral problems of children with ADHD.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Attention
  • Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity / rehabilitation*
  • Child
  • Cross-Over Studies
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Impulsive Behavior / rehabilitation
  • Male
  • Neuropsychological Tests
  • Occupational Therapy / methods*
  • Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
  • Reaction Time
  • Taiwan