Oxidative stress, prooxidants, and antioxidants: the interplay

Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:761264. doi: 10.1155/2014/761264. Epub 2014 Jan 23.

Abstract

Oxidative stress is a normal phenomenon in the body. Under normal conditions, the physiologically important intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are maintained at low levels by various enzyme systems participating in the in vivo redox homeostasis. Therefore, oxidative stress can also be viewed as an imbalance between the prooxidants and antioxidants in the body. For the last two decades, oxidative stress has been one of the most burning topics among the biological researchers all over the world. Several reasons can be assigned to justify its importance: knowledge about reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production and metabolism; identification of biomarkers for oxidative damage; evidence relating manifestation of chronic and some acute health problems to oxidative stress; identification of various dietary antioxidants present in plant foods as bioactive molecules; and so on. This review discusses the importance of oxidative stress in the body growth and development as well as proteomic and genomic evidences of its relationship with disease development, incidence of malignancies and autoimmune disorders, increased susceptibility to bacterial, viral, and parasitic diseases, and an interplay with prooxidants and antioxidants for maintaining a sound health, which would be helpful in enhancing the knowledge of any biochemist, pathophysiologist, or medical personnel regarding this important issue.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Antioxidants / metabolism*
  • Humans
  • Oxidation-Reduction
  • Oxidative Stress / genetics*
  • Reactive Nitrogen Species / metabolism
  • Reactive Oxygen Species / metabolism*

Substances

  • Antioxidants
  • Reactive Nitrogen Species
  • Reactive Oxygen Species