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Tea Consumption Didn't Modify the Risk of Fracture: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

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Review

Tea Consumption Didn't Modify the Risk of Fracture: A Dose-Response Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

Bo Chen et al. Diagn Pathol.

Abstract

Background: Fractures are important causes of healthy damage and economic loss nowadays. The conclusions of observational studies on tea consumption and fracture risk are still inconsistent. The objective of this meta-analysis is to determine the effect of tea drinking on the risk of fractures.

Methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in PubMed, Embase and reference lists of the relevant articles. Observational studies that reported an estimate of the association between tea drinking and incidence of fractures were included. A meta-analysis was conducted by the STATA software.

Results: A total of 9 studies involving 147,950 individuals that examined the association between tea consumption and risk of fractures were included in this meta-analysis. The odds risks (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled using a random-effects model. The pooled OR of 9 observational studies for the tea consumption on risk of fracture was 0.89 (95% CI, 0.78-1.04). In the subgroup analyses, no significant association was detected in neither cohort studies (n=3; OR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.89-1.06) nor case-control studies (n=6; OR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.70-1.19), respectively. No significant association was detected in the dose-response meta-analysis.

Conclusions: Tea consumption might not be associated with the risk of fractures. The following large-sample and well-designed studies are required to confirm the existing conclusions.

Virtual slides: The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/5309904231178427.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Flow diagram showing the identification of relevant studies in the meta-analysis. A total of 500 articles (203 from Pubmed and 297 from EMBASE) were identified from the electronic database searching. Besides, 43 more records were identified through consulting the citations of the relevant reviews and articles. A total of 165 records were detailed evaluated and19 full-text were assessed for eligibility after removing 146 reviews, case reports and overlapped articles. Subsequently 3 articles in which tea extract was studied and 7 ones in which the data not in usable format were excluding from the inclusion and in final, a total of 9 articles were included for the quantitative synthesis.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Forest plot of risk estimates of the association between tea drinking and risk of fracture. In a random-effects meta-analysis, tea intake was not associated the incidence of fracture (OR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.78-1.04). A significant heterogeneity was observed when all the 9 studies were pooled (I2, 73.6%; P < 0.001).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Forest plot of the cumulative meta-analysis. From 1992 to 2013, the tea consumption was inversely associated with the risk of fracture, however, the association was not statistical significant constantly.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Dose–response relationship between tea intake and fracture risk.

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