Effect of a participant-driven health education programme in primary care for people with hyperglycaemia detected by screening: 3-year results from the Ready to Act randomized controlled trial (nested within the ADDITION-Denmark study)

Diabet Med. 2014 Aug;31(8):976-86. doi: 10.1111/dme.12440. Epub 2014 Apr 15.

Abstract

Aim: To assess whether a 12-week participant-driven health education programme offered to individuals with screening-detected hyperglycaemia in Danish primary care would lead to improvements in cardiovascular risk factors, health behaviour and patient-reported outcomes after 3 years.

Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial in 509 patients with screening-detected hyperglycaemia (impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance or type 2 diabetes) from 33 general practices in Denmark. Individuals were pre-randomized to receive (i) routine care (n = 187), or (ii) an invitation to participate in the Ready to Act health education programme (n = 322). The programme was delivered over 12 weeks in primary care and focused on motivation, action experience, informed decision-making and social involvement to promote health behaviour change. The primary outcome was 10-year modelled cardiovascular risk.

Results: Of 322 individuals, 123 (38%) received the intervention and 436/509 individuals (86%) returned for follow-up assessment. There was no difference between the trial groups in modelled cardiovascular risk at 3 years (relative difference: 1.01; 95% CI: 0.84 to 1.23). Total cholesterol was lower (-0.24mmol/l, 95% CI: -0.45 to -0.03, P = 0.027), and patient activation was higher in the intervention than in the control group (5.3, 95% CI: 0.97 to 9.7). No other between-group differences were observed for any cardiovascular risk factor, health behaviour or patient-reported outcome variables. Subgroup analyses suggested that the intervention was more beneficial in those with impaired fasting glucose/impaired glucose tolerance than in those with type 2 diabetes.

Conclusion: For patients with screening-detected hyperglycaemia, a participant-driven health education programme was not associated with improvements in most clinical, behavioural and patient-reported outcomes after 3 years of follow-up.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / complications
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / etiology
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / prevention & control*
  • Combined Modality Therapy
  • Denmark / epidemiology
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / blood
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / complications
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / diagnosis
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / therapy*
  • Diabetic Angiopathies / complications
  • Diabetic Angiopathies / prevention & control
  • Diabetic Cardiomyopathies / complications
  • Diabetic Cardiomyopathies / prevention & control
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Glucose Intolerance / blood
  • Glucose Intolerance / diagnosis
  • Glucose Intolerance / physiopathology
  • Glucose Intolerance / therapy*
  • Health Behavior
  • Humans
  • Hypercholesterolemia / complications
  • Hypercholesterolemia / etiology
  • Hypercholesterolemia / prevention & control
  • Life Style
  • Male
  • Mass Screening
  • Middle Aged
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care
  • Patient Education as Topic*
  • Precision Medicine*
  • Prediabetic State / blood
  • Prediabetic State / diagnosis
  • Prediabetic State / physiopathology
  • Prediabetic State / therapy*
  • Primary Health Care*
  • Risk Factors