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Review
, 14 (5), 336-43

Magnetoencephalography

Affiliations
Review

Magnetoencephalography

Malcolm Proudfoot et al. Pract Neurol.

Abstract

No abstract available

Keywords: BRAIN MAPPING; NEUROPHYSIOLOGY, EXPT.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
The organisation of cortical microcolumns within the sulcal bank, tangentially orientated to the skull, allows their detection with magnetoencephalography since their induced magnetic fields will project beyond the skull surface. Conversely, apical dendrites orientated perpendicularly to the skull, as found at the gyral crown, are better detected by EEG. (From Hansen et al5).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Magnetic field strength density measured in femtotesla (fT), highlighting the exquisite sensitivity of the SQUIDs used in magnetoencephalography.
Figure 3
Figure 3
After 4 s of raw magnetoencephalography data (two channels contain obvious artefacts), the door to the magnetically shielded room is opened during recording. The interference caused by external magnetic fields highlights why effective room shielding is essential.
Figure 4
Figure 4
A MEG recording session at OHBA, eyetracker device shown in foreground.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Sensor space MEG data (A) presented as a two dimensional (2D) topographic map of contrasted α (8–12 Hz) activity in a visual attention task (data concatenated from 38 subjects). α power is lower in the contralateral (attending) hemisphere. MEG data reconstructed into source space (B) with a beamformer approach and presented on a 3D cortical map.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Time–frequency plot from posterior sensors following presentation of a visual stimulus (multiple subjects combined). Increased power is noted in θ followed shortly by γ. Desynchronisation instead occurs in α and β bands. Vertical lines denote stimulus onset/offset.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Comparison of resting-state networks identified from magnetoencephalography and fMRI data independently. (A) Default mode network, (B) left lateral frontoparietal network, (C) right lateral frontoparietal network, (D) sensorimotor network. (Adapted from Brookes et al14).

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