Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 69 (5), 547-58

The FNIH Sarcopenia Project: Rationale, Study Description, Conference Recommendations, and Final Estimates

Affiliations

The FNIH Sarcopenia Project: Rationale, Study Description, Conference Recommendations, and Final Estimates

Stephanie A Studenski et al. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci.

Abstract

Background: Low muscle mass and weakness are common and potentially disabling in older adults, but in order to become recognized as a clinical condition, criteria for diagnosis should be based on clinically relevant thresholds and independently validated. The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Biomarkers Consortium Sarcopenia Project used an evidence-based approach to develop these criteria. Initial findings were presented at a conference in May 2012, which generated recommendations that guided additional analyses to determine final recommended criteria. Details of the Project and its findings are presented in four accompanying manuscripts.

Methods: The Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Sarcopenia Project used data from nine sources of community-dwelling older persons: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study, Boston Puerto Rican Health Study, a series of six clinical trials, Framingham Heart Study, Health, Aging, and Body Composition, Invecchiare in Chianti, Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study, Rancho Bernardo Study, and Study of Osteoporotic Fractures. Feedback from conference attendees was obtained via surveys and breakout groups.

Results: The pooled sample included 26,625 participants (57% women, mean age in men 75.2 [±6.1 SD] and in women 78.6 [±5.9] years). Conference attendees emphasized the importance of evaluating the influence of body mass on cutpoints. Based on the analyses presented in this series, the final recommended cutpoints for weakness are grip strength <26kg for men and <16kg for women, and for low lean mass, appendicular lean mass adjusted for body mass index <0.789 for men and <0.512 for women.

Conclusions: These evidence-based cutpoints, based on a large and diverse population, may help identify participants for clinical trials and should be evaluated among populations with high rates of functional limitations.

Keywords: Aging; Muscle; Outcomes; Sarcopenia; Weakness..

Figures

Figure 1.
Figure 1.
Clinical paradigm.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 300 PubMed Central articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Abellan van Kan G. Epidemiology and consequences of sarcopenia. J Nutr Health Aging. 2009;13:708–712 - PubMed
    1. Visser M, Schaap LA. Consequences of sarcopenia. Clin Geriatr Med. 2011;27:387–399. 10.1016/j.cger.2011.03.006 - PubMed
    1. Newman AB, Kupelian V, Visser M, et al. Sarcopenia: alternative definitions and associations with lower extremity function. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2003;51:1602–1609. 10.1046/j.1532-5415.2003.51534.x - PubMed
    1. Clark BC, Manini TM. Sarcopenia =/= dynapenia. J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2008;63:829–834 - PubMed
    1. Schaap LA, Koster A, Visser M. Adiposity, muscle mass, and muscle strength in relation to functional decline in older persons. Epidemiol Rev. 2012. 10.1093/epirev/mxs006 - PubMed

Publication types

Grant support

Feedback