An ecological analysis of the incidence of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix in Hispanic women in the United States

Ethn Dis. Spring 2014;24(2):243-7.

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between county-level characteristics and the incidence of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix among Hispanic women.

Methods: The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Program's 18 registries from 2000-2009 were queried. Average annual age-adjusted incidence rates for invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix among Hispanic women were calculated. Patients were then stratified by residence in a county with high vs low percent language isolation (LI), income, and education levels.

Results: Among Hispanic women living in high LI, the highest incidence of cervical cancer was found among women residing in counties with low incomes and low education levels (11.3; CI: 10.8-11.8).

Conclusions: County-level characteristics are associated with cervical cancer incidence in Hispanic women. A more precise understanding of contributing socioeconomic factors such as language may facilitate the design of targeted research studies and interventions, and community-level public policy interventions might be effective in reducing the unequal burden of cervical cancer in Hispanic women in the United States.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / epidemiology*
  • Carcinoma, Squamous Cell / ethnology*
  • Communication Barriers
  • Environment
  • Female
  • Hispanic Americans / statistics & numerical data*
  • Humans
  • Incidence
  • Registries
  • Risk Factors
  • SEER Program
  • Social Isolation
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • United States / epidemiology
  • Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / epidemiology*
  • Uterine Cervical Neoplasms / ethnology*