Smoking and attitudes toward smoking among clinical nurse specialists, critical care nurses, and medical-surgical nurses

Oncol Nurs Forum. Nov-Dec 1989;16(6):795-9.

Abstract

This study surveyed pulmonary clinical nurse specialists, oncology clinical nurse specialists, critical care nurses, and medical-surgical nurses to assess smoking prevalence, attitudes toward the educator and exemplar role, and reasons for smoking. Of the 120 questionnaires distributed, 114 (95%) were returned. Of the oncology clinical nurse specialists, 23.1% were former smokers and none reported currently smoking. Prevalence of smoking among the remaining groups was 28.5% for pulmonary clinical nurse specialists, 30% for medical-surgical nurses, and 46.7% for critical care nurses. More than 70% of respondents agreed with statements about the nurse as educator and exemplar (role model) in smoking cessation. This study provides evidence of a lower prevalence of cigarette smoking among nurses prepared as oncology clinical specialists and greater support for the educator and exemplar role than previously reported.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Attitude of Health Personnel
  • Critical Care*
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Lung Diseases / nursing*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Nurse Clinicians*
  • Oncology Nursing*
  • Pennsylvania / epidemiology
  • Perioperative Nursing*
  • Prevalence
  • Smoking / epidemiology
  • Smoking / psychology*
  • Specialties, Nursing*