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Comparative Study
, 24 (8), 523-7

Safety and Feasibility of Needlescopic Grasper-Assisted Single-Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy in Patients With Acute Cholecystitis: Comparison With Three-Port Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

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Comparative Study

Safety and Feasibility of Needlescopic Grasper-Assisted Single-Incision Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy in Patients With Acute Cholecystitis: Comparison With Three-Port Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

Min-Jung Kim et al. J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A.

Abstract

Introduction: Single-incision laparoscopic cholecystectomy (SILC) has been increasing in use steadily, and many researchers have reported the safety and feasibility of SILC. However, most studies were confined to selected patients and excluded patients with acute inflammation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and feasibility of SILC with our technique in patients with acute cholecystitis.

Patients and methods: Ninety-six patients with acute cholecystitis undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy at Uijeonbu St. Mary's Hospital (Uijeongbu, Korea) between October 2011 and December 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. SILC was performed in 49 patients, and conventional three-port laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in 47 patients. Patient demographics and operative outcomes were compared between groups to evaluate the safety and feasibility of SILC using our technique.

Results: There were no differences between groups in demographics except for the sex ratio. SILC was more often performed in female patients (69% versus 34%, P=.001). There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of operation time, critical view of safety identification time, iatrogenic gallbladder perforation, port-site seroma, and postoperative hospital stay, respectively. One patient in each group required conversion to open cholecystectomy because of massive bleeding.

Conclusions: This study showed that needlescopic grasper-assisted SILC with our technique is acceptable not only in selected patients but also in patients with acute cholecystitis. Lateral and cephalad retraction using a needlescopic grasper and a snake retractor can make SILC safe and easy in acute cholecystitis through better visualization of the triangle of Calot.

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