Acceptability of the human papillomavirus vaccine and reasons for non-vaccination among parents of adolescent sons

Vaccine. 2014 Jun 30;32(31):3883-5. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.05.035. Epub 2014 May 18.

Abstract

Routine administration of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has been recommended for 11-12-year-old males since 2011, but coverage remains low. In a U.S. national sample of parents of 11-17-year-old males (n=779), 78.6% of parents reported their sons had not received the HPV vaccine. The most common reason for non-vaccination (56.7%) was "My doctor or healthcare provider has not recommended it." Parents citing only logistical reasons for non-vaccination (e.g., lack of recommendation, access, or education, n=384) reported significantly higher vaccine acceptability than parents reporting a combination of attitudinal (e.g., concerns about vaccine safety or efficacy) and logistical barriers (n=92), while parents citing only attitudinal barriers (n=73) reported the lowest level of vaccine acceptability. In sum, many parents are willing but have not vaccinated sons due to logistical barriers, most commonly lack of healthcare provider recommendation. These findings have important implications for increasing HPV vaccination coverage among adolescent males.

Keywords: Adolescence; Healthcare providers; Human papillomavirus; Vaccination; Vaccine acceptability.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Child
  • Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice*
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Papillomavirus Infections / prevention & control
  • Papillomavirus Vaccines / administration & dosage*
  • Parents / psychology*
  • Patient Acceptance of Health Care*
  • United States
  • Vaccination / psychology*

Substances

  • Papillomavirus Vaccines