Robotic systems in spine surgery

Turk Neurosurg. 2014;24(3):305-11. doi: 10.5137/1019-5149.JTN.8292-13.1.

Abstract

Surgical robotic systems have been available for almost twenty years. The first surgical robotic systems were designed as supportive systems for laparoscopic approaches in general surgery (the first procedure was a cholecystectomy in 1987). The da Vinci Robotic System is the most common system used for robotic surgery today. This system is widely used in urology, gynecology and other surgical disciplines, and recently there have been initial reports of its use in spine surgery, for transoral access and anterior approaches for lumbar inter-body fusion interventions. SpineAssist, which is widely used in spine surgery, and Renaissance Robotic Systems, which are considered the next generation of robotic systems, are now FDA approved. These robotic systems are designed for use as guidance systems in spine instrumentation, cement augmentations and biopsies. The aim is to increase surgical accuracy while reducing the intra-operative exposure to harmful radiation to the patient and operating team personnel during the intervention. We offer a review of the published literature related to the use of robotic systems in spine surgery and provide information on using robotic systems.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Humans
  • Neurosurgical Procedures / instrumentation
  • Neurosurgical Procedures / methods
  • Orthopedic Procedures / instrumentation
  • Orthopedic Procedures / methods
  • Robotics / instrumentation*
  • Robotics / methods*
  • Spine / surgery*