Staphylococcus aureus - antimicrobial resistance and the immunocompromised child

Infect Drug Resist. 2014 May 7;7:117-27. doi: 10.2147/IDR.S39639. eCollection 2014.

Abstract

Children with immunocompromising conditions represent a unique group for the acquisition of antimicrobial resistant infections due to their frequent encounters with the health care system, need for empiric antimicrobials, and immune dysfunction. These infections are further complicated in that there is a relative paucity of literature on the clinical features and management of Staphylococcus aureus infections in immunocompromised children. The available literature on the clinical features, antimicrobial susceptibility, and management of S. aureus infections in immunocompromised children is reviewed. S. aureus infections in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are associated with higher HIV viral loads and a greater degree of CD4 T-cell suppression. In addition, staphylococcal infections in children with HIV often exhibit a multidrug resistant phenotype. Children with cancer have a high rate of S. aureus bacteremia and associated complications. Increased tolerance to antiseptics among staphylococcal isolates from pediatric oncology patients is an emerging area of research. The incidence of S. aureus infections among pediatric solid organ transplant recipients varies considerably by the organ transplanted; in general however, staphylococci figure prominently among infections in the early posttransplant period. Staphylococcal infections are also prominent pathogens among children with a number of immunodeficiencies, notably chronic granulomatous disease. Significant gaps in knowledge exist regarding the epidemiology and management of S. aureus infection in these vulnerable children.

Keywords: HIV; cancer; pediatric; transplant.

Publication types

  • Review