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, 44 (3), 113-8

Effects of Various Toothpastes on Remineralization of White Spot Lesions

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Effects of Various Toothpastes on Remineralization of White Spot Lesions

Su-Yeon Jo et al. Korean J Orthod.

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was to examine the effects of fluoridated, casein phosphopeptide.amorphous calcium phosphate complex (CPP-ACP)-containing, and functionalized β-tricalcium phosphate (fTCP)-containing toothpastes on remineralization of white spot lesions (WSLs) by using Quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF-D) Biluminator™ 2.

Methods: Forty-eight premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons from 12 patients, with artificially induced WSLs were randomly and equally assigned to four treatment groups: fluoride (1,000 ppm), CPP-ACP, fTCP (with sodium fluoride), and control (deionized water) groups. Specimens were treated twice daily for 2 weeks and stored in saliva solution (1:1 mixture of artificial and human stimulated saliva) otherwise. QLF-D Biluminator™ 2 was used to measure changes in fluorescence, indicating alterations in the mineral contents of the WSLs, immediately before and after the 2 weeks of treatment.

Results: Fluorescence greatly increased in the fTCP and CPP-ACP groups compared with the fluoride and control groups, which did not show significant differences.

Conclusions: fTCP- and CPP-ACP-containing toothpastes seem to be more effective in reducing WSLs than 1,000-ppm fluoride-containing toothpastes.

Keywords: Cariology; Remineralization; Tooth paste; Tricalcium phosphate; White spot lesions.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors report no commercial, proprietary, or financial interest in the products or companies described in this article.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Representative light-induced fluorescent images of the control group. Pretreatment (A) and post-treatment (B).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Representative light-induced fluorescent images of the fluoride group. Pretreatment (A) and post-treatment (B).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Representative light-induced fluorescent images of the casein phosphopeptide.amorphous calcium phosphate complex group. Pretreatment (A) and post-treatment (B).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Representative light-induced fluorescent images of the functionalized β-tricalcium phosphate group. Pretreatment (A) and post-treatment (B).

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