Correlates of Current Smoking Among Malaysian Secondary School Children

Asia Pac J Public Health. 2014 Sep;26(5 Suppl):70S-80S. doi: 10.1177/1010539514540468. Epub 2014 Jun 25.

Abstract

Cigarette smoking in adolescent is a significant public health problem, leading to the risk of addiction, morbidity, and mortality in the long term. This study determined the prevalence and correlates of current smoking among adolescent school children. A nationwide school-based survey among 25 507 students between Forms 1 to 5 (aged 12-17) was conducted using a 2-stage cluster sampling design. The prevalence of current smoking was 11.5%. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that current smoking was significantly associated with males (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.25; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.87, 4.98), current drinking (aOR = 2.34; 95% CI = 1.46, 3.74), drug used (aOR = 2.97; 95% CI = 1.24, 7.11), and being bullied (aOR = 1.41; 95% CI = 1.00, 1.98) at least once in the past 12 months. Smoking is associated with several behaviors that pose risks to adolescents, such as social issues and smoking-related health problems. Thus, early and integrated prevention programs that address multiple risk behaviors simultaneously are required.

Keywords: Global School Health Survey (GSHS); Malaysia; adolescent; bullying; drinking alcohol; smoking; substance use.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Alcohol Drinking / epidemiology*
  • Bullying / psychology*
  • Child
  • Cluster Analysis
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Health Surveys
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Malaysia / epidemiology
  • Male
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Prevalence
  • Risk Factors
  • Risk-Taking
  • Sex Distribution
  • Smoking / epidemiology*
  • Students / psychology*
  • Students / statistics & numerical data
  • Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology*