Analyzing support of postnatal transition in term infants after c-section

BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2014 Jul 11;14:225. doi: 10.1186/1471-2393-14-225.

Abstract

Background: Whereas good data are available on the resuscitation of infants, little is known regarding support of postnatal transition in low-risk term infants after c-section. The present study was performed to describe current delivery room (DR) management of term infants born by c-section in our institution by analyzing videos that were recorded within a quality assurance program.

Methods: DR- management is routinely recorded within a quality assurance program. Cross-sectional study of videos of term infants born by c-section. Videos were analyzed with respect to time point, duration and number of all medical interventions. Study period was between January and December 2012.

Results: 186 videos were analyzed. The majority of infants (73%) were without support of postnatal transition. In infants with support of transition, majority of infants received respiratory support, starting in median after 3.4 minutes (range 0.4-14.2) and lasting for 8.8 (1.5-28.5) minutes. Only 33% of infants with support had to be admitted to the NICU, the remaining infants were returned to the mother after a median of 13.5 (8-42) minutes. A great inter- and intra-individual variation with respect to the sequence of interventions was found.

Conclusions: The study provides data for an internal quality improvement program and supports the benefit of using routine video recording of DR-management. Furthermore, data can be used for benchmarking with current practice in other centers.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Body Temperature
  • Catheterization, Peripheral
  • Cesarean Section*
  • Delivery Rooms
  • Heart Auscultation
  • Humans
  • Infant, Newborn
  • Oximetry
  • Postnatal Care*
  • Process Assessment, Health Care*
  • Quality Improvement
  • Respiration, Artificial
  • Suction
  • Term Birth*
  • Time Factors
  • Video Recording