Melanocyte biology and function with reference to oral melanin hyperpigmentation in HIV-seropositive subjects

AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses. 2014 Sep;30(9):837-43. doi: 10.1089/AID.2014.0062. Epub 2014 Aug 11.

Abstract

The color of normal skin and of oral mucosa is not determined by the number of melanocytes in the epithelium but rather by their melanogenic activity. Pigmented biopolymers or melanins are synthesized in melanosomes. Tyrosinase is the critical enzyme in the biosynthesis of both brown/black eumelanin and yellow/red pheomelanin. The number of the melanosomes within the melanocytes, the type of melanin within the melanosomes, and the efficacy of the transfer of melanosomes from the melanocytes to the neighboring keratinocytes all play an important role in tissue pigmentation. Melanin production is regulated by locally produced factors including proopiomelanocortin and its derivative peptides, particularly alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), adrenergic and cholinergic agents, growth factors, cytokines, and nitric oxide. Both eumelanin and pheomelanin can be produced by the same melanocytes, and the proportion of the two melanin types is influenced by the degree of functional activity of the α-MSH/MC1R intracellular pathway. The cause of HIV oral melanosis is not fully understood but may be associated with HIV-induced cytokine dysregulation, with the medications commonly prescribed to HIV-seropositive persons, and with adrenocortical dysfunction, which is not uncommon in HIV-seropositive subjects with AIDS. The purpose of this article is to discuss some aspects of melanocyte biology and HIV-associated oral melanin hyperpigmentation.

Publication types

  • Review

MeSH terms

  • HIV Seropositivity / complications*
  • HIV Seropositivity / metabolism
  • Humans
  • Melanins / biosynthesis
  • Melanins / metabolism*
  • Melanocytes / cytology*
  • Mouth Mucosa / metabolism*
  • Pigmentation Disorders / complications*
  • Pigmentation Disorders / metabolism

Substances

  • Melanins