Tumor-associated macrophages: from mechanisms to therapy

Immunity. 2014 Jul 17;41(1):49-61. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2014.06.010.

Abstract

The tumor microenvironment is a complex ecology of cells that evolves with and provides support to tumor cells during the transition to malignancy. Among the innate and adaptive immune cells recruited to the tumor site, macrophages are particularly abundant and are present at all stages of tumor progression. Clinical studies and experimental mouse models indicate that these macrophages generally play a protumoral role. In the primary tumor, macrophages can stimulate angiogenesis and enhance tumor cell invasion, motility, and intravasation. During monocytes and/or metastasis, macrophages prime the premetastatic site and promote tumor cell extravasation, survival, and persistent growth. Macrophages are also immunosuppressive, preventing tumor cell attack by natural killer and T cells during tumor progression and after recovery from chemo- or immunotherapy. Therapeutic success in targeting these protumoral roles in preclinical models and in early clinical trials suggests that macrophages are attractive targets as part of combination therapy in cancer treatment.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Cell Lineage / immunology*
  • Cell Movement
  • Cell Proliferation
  • Cell Survival
  • Cell Transformation, Neoplastic / immunology*
  • Humans
  • Immunosuppression
  • Macrophages / immunology*
  • Mice
  • Neoplasm Invasiveness
  • Neoplasm Metastasis
  • Neoplasms / immunology*
  • Neoplasms / pathology
  • Neoplasms / therapy*
  • Neovascularization, Pathologic / immunology
  • Tumor Microenvironment