Parallel universes of Black Six biology

Biol Direct. 2014 Jul 19;9:18. doi: 10.1186/1745-6150-9-18.

Abstract

Creation of lethal and synthetic lethal mutations in an experimental organism is a cornerstone of genetic dissection of gene function, and is related to the concept of an essential gene. Common inbred mouse strains carry background mutations, which can act as genetic modifiers, interfering with the assignment of gene essentiality. The inbred strain C57BL/6J, commonly known as "Black Six", stands out, as it carries a spontaneous homozygous deletion in the nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (Nnt) gene [GenBank: AH009385.2], resulting in impairment of steroidogenic mitochondria of the adrenal gland, and a multitude of indirect modifier effects, coming from alteration of glucocorticoid-regulated processes. Over time, the popular strain has been used, by means of gene targeting technology, to assign "essential" and "redundant" qualifiers to numerous genes, thus creating an internally consistent "parallel universe" of knowledge. It is unrealistic to suggest phasing-out of this strain, given the scope of shared resources built around it, however, continuing on the road of "strain-unawareness" will result in profound waste of effort, particularly where translational research is concerned. The review analyzes the historical roots of this phenomenon and proposes that building of "parallel universes" should be urgently made visible to a critical reader by obligatory use of unambiguous and persistent tags in publications and databases, such as hypertext links, pointing to a vendor's strain description web page, or to a digital object identifier (d.o.i.) of the original publication, so that any research done exclusively in C57BL/6J, could be easily identified.

Reviewers: This article was reviewed by Dr. Neil Smalheiser and Dr. Miguel Andrade-Navarro.

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Endophenotypes
  • Genomics*
  • Mice, Inbred C57BL
  • Mutation / genetics*
  • NADP Transhydrogenases / genetics

Substances

  • NADP Transhydrogenases