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, 37 (2), 406-13

Characterization and Mapping of a Spotted Leaf Mutant in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

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Characterization and Mapping of a Spotted Leaf Mutant in Rice (Oryza Sativa)

Xue Xu et al. Genet Mol Biol.

Abstract

Spotted leaf mutant belongs to a class of mutants that can produce necrotic lesions spontaneously in plants without any attack by pathogens. These mutants have no beneficial effect on plant productivity but provide a unique opportunity to study programmed cell death in plant defense responses. A novel rice spotted leaf mutant (spl30) was isolated through low-energy heavy ion irradiation. Lesion expression was sensitive to light and humidity. The spl30 mutant caused a decrease in chlorophyll and soluble protein content, with marked accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) around the lesions. In addition, the spl30 mutant significantly enhanced resistance to rice bacterial blight (X. oryzae pv. oryzae) from China (C1-C7). The use of SSR markers showed that the spl30 gene was located between markers XSN2 and XSN4. The genetic distance between the spl30 gene and XSN2 and between spl30 and XSN4 was 1.7 cM and 0.2 cM, respectively. The spl30 gene is a new gene involved in lesion production and may be related to programmed cell death in rice. The ability of this mutant to confer broad resistance to bacterial blight provides a model for studying the interaction between plants and pathogenic bacteria.

Keywords: gene mapping; reactive oxygen species; rice (Orzya sativa); rice bacterial blight; spotted leaf mutant.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Phenotype of wild-type and mutant leaves. (a) Leaves of wild-type plant grown in the field, (b) Leaves of spl30 mutant grown in the field and (c) Leaves of spl30 mutant grown in a glasshouse.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Scanning electron micrographs of the surface of wild-type (a) and spl30 mutant (b) leaves.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Analysis of chlorophyll content (a) and soluble protein (b) content, two indicators of senescence.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Photographs of leaves stained with Trypan blue, NBT and DAN. Trypan blue: (a) wild-type and (b) spl30; NBT: (c) wild-type and (d) spl30; DAB: (e) wild-type and (f) spl30.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Analysis of lesions in leaves of wild-type and spl30 plants after inoculation with bacterial blight isolates. (a) Lesion length in wild-type and spl30 plants. (b) Phenotypes of leaves from wild-type and spl30 plants (from left).
Figure 6
Figure 6
Linkage relationships of spl30 with its markers on chromosome 9 of rice.
Figure 7
Figure 7
Expression analysis of Spl5, Spl11 and Spl28 by assessed by RT-PCR.

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