Clinical outcome and predictors of mortality in children with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock from Rohtak, Haryana: A prospective observational study

Indian J Crit Care Med. 2014 Jul;18(7):437-41. doi: 10.4103/0972-5229.136072.

Abstract

Background: Information regarding early predictive factors for mortality and morbidity in sepsis is limited from developing countries.

Methods: A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the clinical outcome and predictors of mortality in children with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock. Children aged 1 month to 14 years admitted to a tertiary care pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with a diagnosis of sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock were enrolled in the study. Hemodynamic and laboratory parameters which discriminate survivors from nonsurvivors were evaluated.

Results: A total of 50 patients (30 [60%] males) were enrolled in the study, of whom 21 (42%) were discharged (survivors) and rest 29 (58%) expired (nonsurvivor). Median (interquartile range) age of enrolled patients were 18 (6, 60) months. Mortality was not significantly predicted individually by any factor including age (odds ratio [OR] [95% confidence interval [CI]]: 0.96 [0.91-1.01], P = 0.17), duration of PICU stay (OR [95% CI]: 1.18 [0.99-1.25], P = 0.054), time lag to PICU transfer (OR [95% CI]: 1.02 [0.93-1.12], P = 0.63), Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) score at admission (OR [95% CI]: 0.71 [0.47-1.04], P = 0.07) and number of organ dysfunction (OR [95% CI]: 0.03 [0.01-1.53], P = 0.08).

Conclusion: Mortality among children with sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock were not predicted by any individual factors including the time lag to PICU transfer, duration of PICU stay, presence of multiorgan dysfunction, and PRISM score at admission.

Keywords: Multiorgan dysfunction; pediatric risk of mortality scoring; sepsis; septic shock.