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Case Reports
, 9 (2), 292-6

Small Bowel Necrosis as a Consequence of Spontaneous Deflation and Migration of an Air-Filled Intragastric Balloon - A Potentially Life-Threatening Complication

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Case Reports

Small Bowel Necrosis as a Consequence of Spontaneous Deflation and Migration of an Air-Filled Intragastric Balloon - A Potentially Life-Threatening Complication

Robert Drozdowski et al. Wideochir Inne Tech Maloinwazyjne.

Abstract

Intragastric balloon placement is a common method of treatment of obesity and is often used by non-surgical teams in endoscopy departments. The likelihood of spontaneous intragastric balloon damage is a well-known phenomenon. We describe a patient who was disqualified from surgical obesity treatment and in whom intragastric fluid-filled balloons had already been inserted twice and removed due to their intolerance. Therefore we qualified this patient for placement of the air-filled balloon Heliosphere BAG. Two months after the planned check-up, he arrived at the surgery department complaining of nausea and vomiting and due to symptoms of ileus diagnosed with an X-ray and ultrasound examination we qualified him for emergency surgery. We would like to emphasise the following issues: the necessity of air-filled balloon removal according to the producer's instructions and multidisciplinary specialist team care along with appropriate diagnostic tools in every case of intragastric balloon insertion.

Keywords: intragastric balloon; mechanical ileus; obesity; treatment.

Figures

Photo 1
Photo 1
“Heliosphere BAG®” balloon inserted into the stomach
Photo 2
Photo 2
The early stage of “Heliosphere BAG®” balloon filling; the separated balloon sheath can be seen in the foreground
Photo 3
Photo 3
“Heliosphere BAG®” balloon already air-filled
Photo 4
Photo 4
The bowel wall multiple necrosis at the level of the balloon
Photo 5
Photo 5
The picture shows a mandrin enabling insertion of a set to a stomach, the balloon sheath, rolled-up balloon and its valve. After the insertion, the balloon left in the stomach on its own remains invisible in X-ray due to losing pressure while migrating into the gastrointestinal tract. Inserting a wire or a net into the balloon wall would make it possible to trace its migration into the gastrointestinal tract

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Cited by 4 PubMed Central articles

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