Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
, 17 (4), 369-73

Comparison of Surface Abrasion Produced on the Enamel Surface by a Standard Dentifrice Using Three Different Toothbrush Bristle Designs: A Profilometric in Vitro Study

Affiliations

Comparison of Surface Abrasion Produced on the Enamel Surface by a Standard Dentifrice Using Three Different Toothbrush Bristle Designs: A Profilometric in Vitro Study

Sandeep Kumar et al. J Conserv Dent.

Abstract

Aim: The aim was to assess, in vitro, the effect on surface abrasivity of enamel surface caused by three different types (flat trim, zig-zag, bi-level) of toothbrush bristle design.

Materials and methods: Twenty-four freshly extracted, sound, human incisor teeth were collected for this study. The enamel slab was prepared, which were mounted, on separate acrylic bases followed by subjected to profilometric analysis. The surface roughness was measured using the profilometer. The specimen were divided into three groups, each group containing eight mounted specimens, wherein, Group 1 specimens were brushed with flat trim toothbrush; Group 2 brushed with zig-zag and Group 3 with bi-level bristle design. A commercially available dentifrice was used throughout the study. A single specimen was brushed for 2 times daily for 2 min period for 1 week using a customized brushing apparatus. The pre- and post-roughness value change were analyzed and recorded.

Statistical test: Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test.

Result: The results showed that surface abrasion was produced on each specimen, in all the three groups, which were subjected to brushing cycle. However, the bi-level bristle design (350% increase in roughness, P = 0.021) and zig-zag bristle design (160% increase in roughness, P = 0.050) showed significantly higher surface abrasion when compared with flat trim bristle design toothbrush.

Conclusion: Flat trim toothbrush bristle produces least surface abrasion and is relatively safe for use.

Keywords: Abrasion; bristles; dentifrice; toothbrush.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of Interest: None declared.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 2 PubMed Central articles

References

    1. Ebenezer J, Adhikari DD, Mathew GC, Chacko RK. An unusual injury from a toothbrush: a case report. J Indian Soc Pedod Prev Dent. 2007;25:200–2. - PubMed
    1. Parizotto SP, Rodrigues CR, Singer Jda M, Sef HC. Effectiveness of low cost toothbrushes, with or without dentifrice, in the removal of bacterial plaque in deciduous teeth. Pesqui Odontol Bras. 2003;17:17–23. - PubMed
    1. Grippo JO, Simring M, Schreiner S. Attrition, abrasion, corrosion and abfraction revisited: a new perspective on tooth surface lesions. J Am Dent Assoc. 2004;135:1109–18. - PubMed
    1. Bartlett DW, Shah P. A critical review of non-carious cervical (wear) lesions and the role of abfraction, erosion, and abrasion. J Dent Res. 2006;85:306–12. - PubMed
    1. Wiegand A, Begic M, Attin T. In vitro evaluation of abrasion of eroded enamel by different manual, power and sonic toothbrushes. Caries Res. 2006;40:60–5. - PubMed
Feedback