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Procalcitonin as an Early Diagnostic and Monitoring Tool in Urosepsis Following Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

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Procalcitonin as an Early Diagnostic and Monitoring Tool in Urosepsis Following Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

Ji Zheng et al. Urolithiasis.

Abstract

To evaluate the value of procalcitonin (PCT) as an early marker for diagnosis and differentiation of without urosepsis, urosepsis, severe urosepsis, and uroseptic shock following PCNL and the ability of PCT to assess the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in patients with urosepsis. From June 2012 to August 2013, 267 patients undergoing PCNL for renal calculi, and who fulfilled selection criteria, were recruited into our study. The patients' medical records were reviewed retrospectively. One of selection criteria was the scores of PCT and WBC were collected at operative day, postoperative day one, day two, day three, day five and day seven. The area under the ROC curve for the prediction of urosepsis was 0.960 for PCT and 0.634 for WBC. PCT concentrations were higher in patients with uroseptic shock versus severe urosepsis versus urosepsis versus without urosepsis following PCNL. WBC values showed no significant difference between patients with urosepsis, severe urosepsis and uroseptic shock following PCNL. With time, in patients with successfully treated urosepsis following PCNL, the PCT concentrations significantly declined and kept decreasing from postoperative day two to postoperative day seven and the WBC scores showed no significant change over the first postoperative 2 days and were decreased only after postoperative day three. PCT appears to be a useful early marker to diagnosis and discriminate urosepsis, severe urosepsis and uroseptic shock following PCNL. Daily PCT measurements may be a valuable tool in monitoring the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy in urosepsis following PCNL.

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