Evidence for the efficacy of a bioresonance method in smoking cessation: a pilot study

Forsch Komplementmed. 2014;21(4):239-45. doi: 10.1159/000365742. Epub 2014 Aug 5.

Abstract

Background: Since the 1970s, MORA bioresonance therapy has globally been applied in the context of complementary medicine for various indications. In this regard, practitioners also report successful application in smoking cessation. The present study aims to verify these reports in a controlled study setting.

Methods: In order to achieve the aforementioned objective, we subjected the bioresonance method to a prospective, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group study involving 190 smokers. In both study groups (placebo n = 95; active bioresonance group; n = 95) the course of treatment and study conditions were standardized.

Results: 1 week (77.2% vs. 54.8%), 2 weeks (62.4% vs. 34.4%), 1 month (51.1% vs. 28.6%), and 1 year (28.6% vs. 16.1%) after treatment, the success rate in the verum group differed significantly from the results in the placebo group. Also, the subjective health condition after treatment and subjective assessment of efficacy, polled after 1 week, were significantly more positive among participants in the active bioresonance therapy group than among those in the placebo group. Adverse side effects were not observed.

Conclusion: According to the findings attained by this pilot study, bioresonance therapy is clinically effective in smoking cessation and does not show any adverse side effects.

Publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Randomized Controlled Trial

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Complementary Therapies / standards*
  • Double-Blind Method
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Pilot Projects
  • Smoking Cessation / methods*
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Turkey
  • Young Adult