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Review
, 307 (11), C979-85

From Microbe to Man: The Role of Microbial Short Chain Fatty Acid Metabolites in Host Cell Biology

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Review

From Microbe to Man: The Role of Microbial Short Chain Fatty Acid Metabolites in Host Cell Biology

Niranjana Natarajan et al. Am J Physiol Cell Physiol.

Abstract

Recent studies have highlighted a myriad of ways in which the activity and composition of the gut microbiota can affect the host organism. A primary way in which the gut microbiota affect host physiology is by the production of metabolites, such as short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which are subsequently absorbed into the bloodstream of the host. Although recent studies have begun to unravel the ways in which gut microbial SCFAs affect host physiology, less is understood regarding the underlying cell biological mechanisms. In this review, we will outline the known receptors and transporters for SCFAs, and review what is known about the cell biological effects of microbial SCFAs.

Keywords: Gpr41; Gpr43; Olfr78; SCFAs; microbiota.

Figures

Fig. 1.
Fig. 1.
Overview of the role of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in physiology: production, absorption, and systemic effects. Short-chain fatty acids, produced by the breakdown of complex dietary fiber by microbiota in the gut, are absorbed in the bloodstream to be delivered to target tissues. At the target site, they act via G protein coupled receptors (GPCR)—Gpr41, Gpr43, Gpr109a, and Olfr78—to modulate a wide range of cellular responses. MCTs, monocarboxylate transporters; mOATs, multispecific organic anion transporters; HDAC, histone deacetylase.

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