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Review
, 41 (5), 452-7

Proliferation of Keratinocytes Induced by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on a Chitosan Scaffold and Its Role in Wound Healing, a Review

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Review

Proliferation of Keratinocytes Induced by Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on a Chitosan Scaffold and Its Role in Wound Healing, a Review

Sankaralakshmi Gomathysankar et al. Arch Plast Surg.

Abstract

In the field of tissue engineering and reconstruction, the development of efficient biomaterial is in high demand to achieve uncomplicated wound healing. Chronic wounds and excessive scarring are the major complications of tissue repair and, as this inadequate healing continues to increase, novel therapies and treatments for dysfunctional skin repair and reconstruction are important. This paper reviews the various aspects of the complications related to wound healing and focuses on chitosan because of its unique function in accelerating wound healing. The proliferation of keratinocytes is essential for wound closure, and adipose-derived stem cells play a significant role in wound healing. Thus, chitosan in combination with keratinocytes and adipose-derived stem cells may act as a vehicle for delivering cells, which would increase the proliferation of keratinocytes and help complete recovery from injuries.

Keywords: Chitosan; Keratinocytes; Stem cells; Wound healing.

Conflict of interest statement

No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
Chitosan derived from deacetylation of chitin

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