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. 2014;2014:906284.
doi: 10.1155/2014/906284. Epub 2014 Sep 11.

Battery Energy Storage Sizing When Time of Use Pricing Is Applied

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Battery Energy Storage Sizing When Time of Use Pricing Is Applied

Guido Carpinelli et al. ScientificWorldJournal. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Battery energy storage systems (BESSs) are considered a key device to be introduced to actuate the smart grid paradigm. However, the most critical aspect related to the use of such device is its economic feasibility as it is a still developing technology characterized by high costs and limited life duration. Particularly, the sizing of BESSs must be performed in an optimized way in order to maximize the benefits related to their use. This paper presents a simple and quick closed form procedure for the sizing of BESSs in residential and industrial applications when time-of-use tariff schemes are applied. A sensitivity analysis is also performed to consider different perspectives in terms of life span and future costs.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Residential load profile (a). Industrial load profile (b).
Figure 2
Figure 2
Total customer cost with α = 5%, β = 5%, η ch = 95%, and η dch = 98%, for 5% annual load variations and for different installation costs (residential load).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Total customer cost with α = 5%, β = 5%, η ch = 95%, and η dch = 98% for different values of annual load variation (residential load).
Figure 4
Figure 4
Total customer cost with an annual load variation of 5%, η ch = 95%, and η dch = 98% and for different values of α and β (residential load).
Figure 5
Figure 5
Total customer cost with α = 5%, β = 5%, and 5% annual load variation and different values of BESS efficiency (residential load).
Figure 6
Figure 6
Total customer cost with α = 5%, β = 5%, η ch = 95%, and η dch = 98%, for 5% annual load variations (industrial load).
Figure 7
Figure 7
Total customer cost with α = 5%, β = 5%, η ch = 95%, and η dch = 98% for different values of annual load variation (industrial load).
Figure 8
Figure 8
Total customer cost with an annual load variation of 5%, η ch = 95%, and η dch = 98% and for different values of α and β (industrial load).
Figure 9
Figure 9
Total customer cost with α = 5%, β = 5%, and 5% annual load variation and different values of BESS efficiency (industrial load).

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References

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