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Clinical Trial
. 2015 Jan;6(1):204-10.
doi: 10.1039/c4fo00697f. Epub 2014 Oct 27.

Oleic Acid Content of a Meal Promotes Oleoylethanolamide Response and Reduces Subsequent Energy Intake in Humans

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Clinical Trial

Oleic Acid Content of a Meal Promotes Oleoylethanolamide Response and Reduces Subsequent Energy Intake in Humans

Ilario Mennella et al. Food Funct. .

Abstract

Animal data suggest that dietary fat composition may influence endocannabinoid (EC) response and dietary behavior. This study tested the hypothesis that fatty acid composition of a meal can influence the short-term response of ECs and subsequent energy intake in humans. Fifteen volunteers on three occasions were randomly offered a meal containing 30 g of bread and 30 mL of one of three selected oils: sunflower oil (SO), high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) and virgin olive oil (VOO). Plasma EC concentrations and appetite ratings over 2 h and energy intake over 24 h following the experimental meal were measured. Results showed that after HOSO and VOO consumption the circulating oleoylethanolamide (OEA) was significantly higher than after SO consumption; a concomitantly significant reduction of energy intake was found. For the first time the oleic acid content of a meal was demonstrated to increase the post-prandial response of circulating OEA and to reduce energy intake at subsequent meals in humans.

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