Progressive contraction of the latent HIV reservoir around a core of less-differentiated CD4⁺ memory T Cells

Nat Commun. 2014 Nov 10;5:5407. doi: 10.1038/ncomms6407.

Abstract

In patients who are receiving prolonged antiretroviral treatment (ART), HIV can persist within a small pool of long-lived resting memory CD4(+) T cells infected with integrated latent virus. This latent reservoir involves distinct memory subsets. Here we provide results that suggest a progressive reduction of the size of the blood latent reservoir around a core of less-differentiated memory subsets (central memory and stem cell-like memory (TSCM) CD4(+) T cells). This process appears to be driven by the differences in initial sizes and decay rates between latently infected memory subsets. Our results also suggest an extreme stability of the TSCM sub-reservoir, the size of which is directly related to cumulative plasma virus exposure before the onset of ART, stressing the importance of early initiation of effective ART. The presence of these intrinsic dynamics within the latent reservoir may have implications for the design of optimal HIV therapeutic purging strategies.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Anti-Retroviral Agents / therapeutic use
  • CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / pathology
  • CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes / virology*
  • Cell Differentiation / physiology
  • Cohort Studies
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Disease Progression
  • Disease Reservoirs*
  • HIV Infections / drug therapy
  • HIV Infections / pathology
  • HIV Infections / physiopathology*
  • HIV-1 / physiology*
  • Humans
  • T-Lymphocyte Subsets / pathology
  • T-Lymphocyte Subsets / virology
  • Time Factors
  • Viral Load
  • Virus Latency / physiology*

Substances

  • Anti-Retroviral Agents