Eating high fat chow, but not drinking sucrose or saccharin, enhances the development of sensitization to the locomotor effects of cocaine in adolescent female rats

Behav Pharmacol. 2015 Apr;26(3):321-5. doi: 10.1097/FBP.0000000000000114.

Abstract

Eating high fat chow accelerates the development of sensitization to cocaine-induced locomotion in female rats. It is not known whether consumption of sucrose or saccharin also increases sensitivity to the behavioral effects of cocaine or whether continuous (or intermittent) access to these feeding conditions is necessary to change sensitivity. Adolescent female Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one of seven feeding conditions from postnatal day 25 through to postnatal day 60. The rats either ate high fat (60% kcal from fat) chow and drank water or ate standard (17% kcal from fat) chow and drank either water, a 10% sucrose solution, or a 0.1% saccharin solution. The rats either had continuous access to high fat chow, sucrose, or saccharin, or had intermittent access (i.e. 2 days/week) to these substances, with access to water and standard chow on other days. As compared with standard chow, continuous (but not intermittent) access to high fat chow enhanced the development of sensitization to cocaine-induced (1-17.8 mg/kg) locomotion; drinking sucrose or saccharin (continuous or intermittent access) did not alter the development of sensitization to cocaine-induced locomotion. The impact of feeding condition on the behavioral effects of cocaine varies between sexes and across dietary composition.

Publication types

  • Comparative Study
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Animals
  • Cocaine / pharmacology*
  • Dietary Fats / administration & dosage*
  • Drinking
  • Eating
  • Energy Intake / drug effects
  • Female
  • Locomotion / drug effects
  • Rats
  • Rats, Sprague-Dawley
  • Saccharin / administration & dosage*
  • Sucrose / administration & dosage*

Substances

  • Dietary Fats
  • Sucrose
  • Saccharin
  • Cocaine