Purified type I collagen wound matrix improves chronic wound healing in patients with recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa

Pediatr Dermatol. Mar-Apr 2015;32(2):220-5. doi: 10.1111/pde.12492. Epub 2014 Dec 29.

Abstract

Recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa is a severe genetic blistering skin condition resulting in chronic wounds. Nonhealing wounds were treated over 8 weeks using a reconstituted natural purified type I collagen skin substitute. Chronic wounds were defined as nonhealing wounds present for longer than 6 months. For each patient, two chronic wounds were identified and randomized into a control or treatment group. Both groups received standard-of-care wound dressings. The treatment group received an additional type I collagen skin substitute. Wound size was measured at baseline and weeks 1, 4, and 8. Pain, pruritus, and burning and stinging were assessed. Wound cultures were obtained at baseline and thereafter as was considered clinically relevant. Ten subjects were enrolled; seven completed the study. Six subjects showed a positive response to the type I collagen skin substitute. Three subjects demonstrated full wound reepithelialization. Wounds treated using the collagen skin substitute showed statistically significantly greater improvement. Average scores for pruritus and pain decreased significantly. Reconstituted natural purified type I collagen skin substitutes improved the healing of chronic wounds and may be a valuable addition to the epidermolysis bullosa wound care arsenal.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Bandages
  • Child
  • Chronic Disease
  • Collagen*
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica / diagnosis*
  • Epidermolysis Bullosa Dystrophica / therapy*
  • Female
  • Follow-Up Studies
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Prospective Studies
  • Quality of Life
  • Skin, Artificial*
  • Statistics, Nonparametric
  • Tissue Engineering
  • Treatment Outcome
  • Wound Healing / physiology*
  • Young Adult

Substances

  • Collagen