HIV-1 Replication and the Cellular Eukaryotic Translation Apparatus

Viruses. 2015 Jan 19;7(1):199-218. doi: 10.3390/v7010199.

Abstract

Eukaryotic translation is a complex process composed of three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During infections by RNA- and DNA-viruses, the eukaryotic translation machinery is used to assure optimal viral protein synthesis. Human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) uses several non-canonical pathways to translate its own proteins, such as leaky scanning, frameshifting, shunt, and cap-independent mechanisms. Moreover, HIV-1 modulates the host translation machinery by targeting key translation factors and overcomes different cellular obstacles that affect protein translation. In this review, we describe how HIV-1 proteins target several components of the eukaryotic translation machinery, which consequently improves viral translation and replication.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

MeSH terms

  • HIV-1 / physiology*
  • Host-Pathogen Interactions*
  • Humans
  • Protein Biosynthesis*
  • Virus Replication*