Skip to main page content
Access keys NCBI Homepage MyNCBI Homepage Main Content Main Navigation
Review
. 2015 Jan 22;7(2):730-50.
doi: 10.3390/nu7020730.

The Positive Effects of Yerba Maté (Ilex Paraguariensis) in Obesity

Affiliations
Free PMC article
Review

The Positive Effects of Yerba Maté (Ilex Paraguariensis) in Obesity

Alessandra Gambero et al. Nutrients. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

The prevalence of obesity has increased worldwide over the past three decades. Global anti-obesity strategies focus on dietary and lifestyle modifications to slow the development of obesity. Research in the nutrition field has recently aroused considerable interest based on the potential of natural products to counteract obesity. Several studies have identified yerba maté (Ilex paraguariensis) as an excellent candidate. In this review, we evaluated the impact of yerba maté on obesity and obesity-related inflammation. Cellular studies demonstrate that yerba maté suppresses adipocyte differentiation and triglyceride accumulation and reduces inflammation. Animal studies show that yerba maté modulates signaling pathways that regulate adipogenesis, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and insulin signaling responses. In summary, the data presented here showed that the use of yerba maté might be useful against obesity, improving the lipid parameters in humans and animal models. In addition, yerba maté modulates the expression of genes that are changed in the obese state and restores them to more normal levels of expression. In doing so, it addresses several of the abnormal and disease-causing factors associated with obesity. Protective and ameliorative effects on insulin resistance were also observed. Thus, as a general conclusion, it seems that yerba maté beverages and supplements might be helpful in the battle against obesity.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
In vivo and in vitro effects of yerba maté in adipogenesis.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Proposed mechanism of action of yerba maté on the modulation of the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway.

Similar articles

See all similar articles

Cited by 7 articles

See all "Cited by" articles

References

    1. Berg A.H., Scherer P.E. Adipose tissue, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. Circ. Res. 2005;96:939–949. doi: 10.1161/01.RES.0000163635.62927.34. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Haslam D.W., James W.P. Obesity. Lancet. 2005;366:1197–1209. doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(05)67483-1. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Vaisse C., Halaas J.L., Horvath C.M., Darnell J.E., Jr., Stoffel M., Friedman J.M. Leptin activation of Stat3 in the hypothalamus of wild-type and ob/ob mice but not db/db mice. Nat. Genet. 1996;14:95–97. doi: 10.1038/ng0996-95. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Zhang Y., Proenca R., Maffei M., Barone M., Leopold L., Friedman J.M. Positional cloning of the mouse obese gene and its human homologue. Nature. 1994;372:425–432. doi: 10.1038/372425a0. - DOI - PubMed
    1. Loffreda S., Yang S.Q., Lin H.Z., Karp C.L., Brengman M.L., Wang D.J., Klein A.S., Bulkley G.B., Bao C., Noble P.W., et al. Leptin regulates proinflammatory immune responses. FASEB J. 1998;12:57–65. - PubMed
Feedback