Influence of Reproductive History and Exogenous Hormone Use on Prevalence and Frequency of Circulating t(14;18)-positive Cells in a Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Mar;26(3):455-65. doi: 10.1007/s10552-015-0525-4. Epub 2015 Jan 30.

Abstract

Purpose: The t(14;18) translocation might represent an intermediate step in the pathogenesis of follicular lymphoma (FL), one of the most common subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Circulating t(14;18)-positive cells can also be detected in 30-60 % of healthy individuals at low frequencies. Some studies found a negative association between reproductive factors or use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) with FL. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether there is an association between number of frequencies, oral contraceptive (OC) use, menopausal status and MHT, and t(14;18) prevalence and frequency in a representative population analysis based on an epidemiologic study in the northeastern part of Germany.

Methods: The analysis is based on results of buffy coat samples from 1,981 women of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-0) and data obtained in standardized face-to-face interviews. For prevalence, odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression. Frequency data were analyzed using negative binomial regression. The multivariable models included age, number of pregnancies, menopausal status (premenopausal, natural, medical/surgical menopause), OC use and MHT as a measure for exogenous hormone exposure use.

Results: We found no association between reproductive history and combined exogenous hormone use on the prevalence of circulating t(14;18)-positive cells. Modeling MHT and OC use separately in a sensitivity analysis, the MHT parameter yielded statistical significance [OR 1.37 (95 % CI 1.04;1.81)]. t(14;18) frequency was associated with use of OC [incidence rate ratio (IRR) for ever use 3.18 (95 % CI 1.54;6.54)], current use [IRR 3.86 (1.56;9.54)], >10 years use [IRR 3.93 (1.67;9.23)] and MHT [restricted to postmenopausal women; IRR 2.63 (95 % CI 1.01;6.85)] in bivariate age-adjusted analyses. In the multivariable model, medical/surgical menopause [IRR 2.46 (1.11;5.44)] and the category ever use of OC and MHT were statistically significant [IRR 2.41 (1.09;5.33)].

Conclusions: Exogenous hormone use might be a risk factor for t(14;18) frequency rather than for t(14;18) prevalence. Further research on healthy individuals carrying a t(14;18) translocation and possible risk factors for malignant lymphoma is necessary to determine the additional molecular or immunological events that have to occur to develop FL.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Cohort Studies
  • Contraceptives, Oral / adverse effects
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Female
  • Germany
  • Hormone Replacement Therapy / adverse effects*
  • Humans
  • Logistic Models
  • Lymphoma, Follicular / etiology*
  • Lymphoma, Follicular / genetics*
  • Menopause
  • Middle Aged
  • Multivariate Analysis
  • Odds Ratio
  • Prevalence
  • Reproductive History
  • Risk Factors
  • Translocation, Genetic*
  • Young Adult

Substances

  • Contraceptives, Oral