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. 2015 Jan 30;7(2):905-21.
doi: 10.3390/nu7020905.

Effect of Curcumin Supplementation on Physiological Fatigue and Physical Performance in Mice

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Free PMC article

Effect of Curcumin Supplementation on Physiological Fatigue and Physical Performance in Mice

Wen-Ching Huang et al. Nutrients. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Curcumin (CCM) is a well-known phytocompound and food component found in the spice turmeric and has multifunctional bioactivities. However, few studies have examined its effects on exercise performance and physical fatigue. We aimed to evaluate the potential beneficial effects of CCM supplementation on fatigue and ergogenic function following physical challenge in mice. Male ICR mice were divided into four groups to receive vehicle or CCM (180 μg/mL) by oral gavage at 0, 12.3, 24.6, or 61.5 mL/kg/day for four weeks. Exercise performance and anti-fatigue function were evaluated after physical challenge by forelimb grip strength, exhaustive swimming time, and levels of physical fatigue-associated biomarkers serum lactate, ammonia, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and glucose and tissue damage markers such as aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), and creatine kinase (CK). CCM supplementation dose-dependently increased grip strength and endurance performance and significantly decreased lactate, ammonia, BUN, AST, ALT, and CK levels after physical challenge. Muscular glycogen content, an important energy source for exercise, was significantly increased. CCM supplementation had few subchronic toxic effects. CCM supplementation may have a wide spectrum of bioactivities for promoting health, improving exercise performance and preventing fatigue.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
HPLC chromatogram of curcuminoids in CCM.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Effect of CCM supplementation on forelimb grip strength. (A) grip strength; (B) relative grip strength. Data are mean ± SEM for n = 10 mice in each group. Different letters indicate significant difference at p < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA. Low-dose (CCM-1X), medium-dose (CCM-2X) and high-dose (CCM-5X) CCM at 12.3, 24.6 and 620 mg/kg/day, respectively.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Effect of CCM supplementation on exhaustive swimming test. Data are mean ± SEM for n = 10 mice in each group. Different letters indicate significant difference at p < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Effect of CCM supplementation on serum (A) lactate; (B) ammonia; (C) glucose; and (D) blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels after acute exercise challenge. Data are mean ± SEM for n = 10 mice in each group. Different letters indicate significant difference at p < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA.
Figure 5
Figure 5
Effect of CCM supplementation on serum levels of (A) creatine kinase (CK); (B) aspartate transaminase (AST); and (C) alanine transaminase (ALT) after acute exercise challenge. Data are mean ± SEM for n = 10 mice in each group. Different letters indicate significant difference at p < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Effect of CCM supplementation on glycogen content in (A) liver and (B) muscle. Data are mean ± SEM for n = 10 mice in each group. Different letters indicate significant difference at p < 0.05 by one-way ANOVA.
Figure 7
Figure 7
The effect of CCM supplementation on growth. Data are mean ± SEM for n = 10 mice per group.
Figure 8
Figure 8
Effect of CCM supplementation on morphology of (A) liver; (B) skeletal muscle; (C) heart; and (D) kidney in mice. Specimens were photographed by light microscopy. (H&E stain, magnification: ×200; Scale bar, 10 μm).

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