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, 56 (2), 125-30

Lessons Learnt in the Management of Primary Invasive Penile Cancer in an Australian Tertiary Referral Centre: Clinical Outcomes With a Minimum 48 Months Follow-Up Study

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Lessons Learnt in the Management of Primary Invasive Penile Cancer in an Australian Tertiary Referral Centre: Clinical Outcomes With a Minimum 48 Months Follow-Up Study

Eric Chung et al. Korean J Urol.

Abstract

Purpose: To report on lessons learnt in the management of primary invasive penile cancer in a major tertiary hospital in Australia.

Materials and methods: Medical records for all patients who underwent surgery for primary invasive penile cancer between January 2000 and January 2011 were obtained. Patient demographics, clinical status of inguinal node, cancer stage and clinical outcomes were reviewed. All patients were followed up for a minimum of 48 months postoperative unless patient deceased within the first 48 months from the time of penile cancer surgery.

Results: Over the 11-year period, a total of 23 cases of invasive penile cancer were identified. Partial penectomy was the most common form of organ preserving surgery and the majority of patients have pT1b disease. Of the 9 patients with clinically palpable inguinal nodes, 7 patients were diagnosed with pN3 disease following inguinal lymphadenectomy. The Kaplan-Meier cancer-specific survival at 72 months showed decreasing survival based on tumour stage (83% in pT1, 79% in pT2, and 64% in pT3 disease) and nodal disease (100% in node negative, 50% in superficial inguinal lymphadenopathy, and 38% in patients with deep inguinal and/or pelvic lymphadenopathy) (p=0.082). The Kaplan-Meier cancer-specific survival revealed statistically significant difference in survival outcome in patients with local recurrence vs. systemic metastasis disease (33% vs. 17%, p=0.008).

Conclusions: The presence of high risk features such as tumour stage, lymph node involvement and distant metastasis carries a significant higher risk of death and tumour recurrence in patients with penile cancer and inguinal lymph node metastasis.

Keywords: Penile neoplasms; Survival; Treatment outcome.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors have nothing to disclose.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
The Kaplan-Meier cancer-specific survival in patients based on various pathological tumour stages at 72 months were 83% in pT1, 79% in pT2, and 64% in pT3 disease (statistical significant between pT2 and pT3; p=0.038).
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
The Kaplan-Meier cancer-specific survival in patients with node negative, superficial inguinal lymphadenopathy, and deep inguinal and/or pelvic lymphadenopathy were 100%, 50%, and 38% at 72 months (p=0.082).
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
The Kaplan-Meier cancer-specific survival in patients with no recurrence, local recurrence and systemic metastasis were 100%, 33%, and 17% at 72 months (p=0.008).

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