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. 2015 Mar;16(3):179-90.
doi: 10.1631/jzus.B1400197.

Moringa Oleifera Extract Enhances Sexual Performance in Stressed Rats

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Free PMC article

Moringa Oleifera Extract Enhances Sexual Performance in Stressed Rats

Thawatchai Prabsattroo et al. J Zhejiang Univ Sci B. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Aphrodisiacs are required to improve male sexual function under stressful conditions. Due to the effects of oxidative stress and dopamine on male sexual function, we hypothesized that Moringa oleifera leaves might improve male sexual dysfunction induced by stress. Therefore, the effects on various factors playing important roles in male sexual behavior, such as antioxidant effects, the suppression of monoamine and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) activities, serum testosterone and corticosterone levels, and histomorphological changes in the testes, of a hydroethanolic extract of M. oleifera leaves were investigated. Various doses of extract including 10, 50, and 250 mg/kg body weight (BW) were given orally to male Wistar rats before exposure to 12 h-immobilization stress for 7 d. The results demonstrated that the extract showed both antioxidant and monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) suppression activities. At 7 d of treatment, the low dose of extract improved sexual performance in stress-exposed rats by decreasing intromission latency and increasing intromission frequency. It also suppressed PDE-5 activity, decreased serum corticosterone level, but increased serum testosterone, numbers of interstitial cells of Leydig and spermatozoa. The increased numbers of interstitial cells of Leydig and spermatozoa might have been due to the antioxidant effect of the extract. The increased sexual performance during the intromission phase might have been due to the suppression of MAO-B and PDE-5 activities and increased testosterone. Therefore, M. oleifera is a potential aphrodisiac, but further research concerning the precise underlying mechanisms is still needed.

Keywords: Moringa oleifera; Sexual behaviors; Stress.

Conflict of interest statement

Compliance with ethics guidelines: Thawatchai PRABSATTROO, Jintanaporn WATTANATHORN, Sitthichai IAMSAARD, Pichet SOMSAPT, Opass SRITRAGOOL, Wipawee THUKHUMMEE, and Supaporn MUCHIMAPURA declare that they have no conflict of interest.

All institutional and national guidelines for the care and use of laboratory animals were followed.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
DPPH radical scavenging activities of M. oleifera leaf extract and ascorbic acid (standard control)
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) of M. oleifera leaf extract using ascorbic acid data to provide a calibration curve FRAP activity of M. oleifera is 399 μmol/L AAE/mg extract
Fig. 3
Fig. 3
Effect of hydro-ethanolic extracts of M. oleifera leaves on phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) activity in the penis of stress-exposed rats after 7 d of treatment Data are expressed as mean±SEM (n=6). * P<0.05, ** P<0.01, compared with Group II. # P<0.05, compared with Group I
Fig. 4
Fig. 4
Effect of hydro-ethanolic extracts of M. oleifera leaves on serum testosterone levels of stress-exposed rats after 7 d of treatment Data are expressed as mean±SEM (n=6). * P<0.05, ** P<0.01, *** P<0.001, compared with Group II. ### P<0.001, compared with Group I
Fig. 5
Fig. 5
Effect of hydro-ethanolic extracts of M. oleifera leaves on serum corticosterone levels of stress-exposed rats after 7 d of treatment Data are expressed as mean±SEM (n=6). * P<0.05, ** P<0.01, *** P<0.001, compared with Group II. # P<0.05, ## P<0.01, compared with Group I
Fig. 6
Fig. 6
Haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained frozen sections of rat testis showing the histomorphology of seminiferous tubules, Sertoli cells (SC), spermatogonia (SG), primary spermatocytes (PS), spermatids (SP), sperm, and Leydig cells (LC) in the following treatment groups: (a) naive control; (b) vehicle plus stress; (c) sildenafil citrate plus stress; (d) Tianeptine plus stress; (e)–(g) M. oleifera at doses of 10, 50, and 250 mg/kg plus stress, respectively

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