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Review
, 3 (3), 275-84

Clinical and Diagnostic Aspects of Gluten Related Disorders

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Review

Clinical and Diagnostic Aspects of Gluten Related Disorders

Francesco Tovoli et al. World J Clin Cases.

Abstract

Gluten is one of the most abundant and widely distributed components of food in many areas. It can be included in wheat, barley, rye, and grains such as oats, barley, spelt, kamut, and triticale. Gluten-containing grains are widely consumed; in particular, wheat is one of the world's primary sources of food, providing up to 50% of the caloric intake in both industrialized and developing countries. Until two decades ago, celiac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders were believed to be exceedingly rare outside of Europe and were relatively ignored by health professionals and the global media. In recent years, however, the discovery of important diagnostic and pathogenic milestones led CD from obscurity to global prominence. In addition, interestingly, people feeding themselves with gluten-free products greatly outnumber patients affected by CD, fuelling a global consumption of gluten-free foods with approximately $2.5 billion in United States sales each year. The acknowledgment of other medical conditions related to gluten that has arisen as health problems, providing a wide spectrum of gluten-related disorders. In February 2011, a new nomenclature for gluten-related disorders was created at a consensus conference in London. In this review, we analyse innovations in the field of research that emerged after the creation of the new classification, with particular attention to the new European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines for CD and the most recent research about non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

Keywords: Anti-gliadin antibodies; Celiac disease; Gluten; Gluten sensitivity; Gluten-free diet; Non-celiac gluten sensitivity; Wheat allergy.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
New nomenclature and proposed classification of gluten related disorders according to the the II Consensus Conference on gluten related disorders held in London in February 2011.

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