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, 2015, 726149

Genetic and Metabolic Intraspecific Biodiversity of Ganoderma Lucidum

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Genetic and Metabolic Intraspecific Biodiversity of Ganoderma Lucidum

Anna Pawlik et al. Biomed Res Int.

Abstract

Fourteen Ganoderma lucidum strains from different geographic regions were identified using ITS region sequencing. Based on the sequences obtained, the genomic relationship between the analyzed strains was determined. All G. lucidum strains were also genetically characterized using the AFLP technique. G. lucidum strains included in the analysis displayed an AFLP profile similarity level in the range from 9.6 to 33.9%. Biolog FF MicroPlates were applied to obtain data on utilization of 95 carbon sources and mitochondrial activity. The analysis allowed comparison of functional diversity of the fungal strains. The substrate utilization profiles for the isolates tested revealed a broad variability within the analyzed G. lucidum species and proved to be a good profiling technology for studying the diversity in fungi. Significant differences have been demonstrated in substrate richness values. Interestingly, the analysis of growth and biomass production also differentiated the strains based on the growth rate on the agar and sawdust substrate. In general, the mycelial growth on the sawdust substrate was more balanced and the fastest fungal growth was observed for GRE3 and FCL192.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Phylogenetic tree based on ITS region sequences for the 14 Ganoderma lucidum strains.
Figure 2
Figure 2
Dendrogram of the 14 G. lucidum strains generated by UPGMA clustering based on Nei and Li's genetic distance (1979).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Phenotype profiles of G. lucidum. Color scale into the heat maps indicates the growth of the organism in particular substrate during 216 hours of incubation.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Functional diversity of the analyzed G. lucidum strains (substrate richness).
Figure 5
Figure 5
Cluster analysis-based dendrogram showing correlation between the Ganoderma lucidum strains in relation to utilization of C-sources from the FF MicroPlate.
Figure 6
Figure 6
Mycelium growth of the examined G. lucidum strains on the different agar media (a) and on the sawdust substrate (b).

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