High-intensity interval training as an efficacious alternative to moderate-intensity continuous training for adults with prediabetes

J Diabetes Res. 2015;2015:191595. doi: 10.1155/2015/191595. Epub 2015 Mar 30.

Abstract

Aims: High-intensity interval training (HIIT) leads to improvements in various markers of cardiometabolic health but adherence to HIIT following a supervised laboratory intervention has yet to be tested. We compared self-report and objective measures of physical activity after one month of independent exercise in individuals with prediabetes who were randomized to HIIT (n = 15) or traditional moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT, n = 17).

Method: After completing 10 sessions of supervised training participants were asked to perform HIIT or MICT three times per week for four weeks.

Results: Individuals in HIIT (89 ± 11%) adhered to their prescribed protocol to a greater extent than individuals in MICT (71 ± 31%) as determined by training logs completed over one-month follow-up (P = 0.05, Cohen's d = 0.75). Minutes spent in vigorous physical activity per week measured by accelerometer were higher in HIIT (24 ± 18) as compared to MICT (11 ± 10) at one-month follow-up (P = 0.049, Cohen's d = 0.92). Cardiorespiratory fitness and systolic blood pressure assessed at one-month follow-up were equally improved (P's < 0.05).

Conclusions: This study provides preliminary evidence that individuals with prediabetes can adhere to HIIT over the short-term and do so at a level that is greater than MICT.

Publication types

  • Randomized Controlled Trial
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Acceleration
  • Adult
  • Anthropometry
  • Cardiovascular Diseases / prevention & control
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 / prevention & control
  • Exercise Therapy / methods*
  • Exercise*
  • Female
  • Heart Rate
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Motor Activity
  • Patient Compliance
  • Physical Fitness
  • Prediabetic State / therapy*
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Systole