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Review
. Jan-Jun 2015;9(17):45-54.
doi: 10.4103/0973-7847.156340.

Phytochemical Profile of Sugarcane and Its Potential Health Aspects

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Free PMC article
Review

Phytochemical Profile of Sugarcane and Its Potential Health Aspects

Amandeep Singh et al. Pharmacogn Rev. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum Linn.) is an important perennial grass of Poaceae family, indigenous to tropical South Asia and Southeast Asia. It is cultivated worldwide due to the economical and medicinal value of its high yielding products. Sugarcane juice is well known as a raw material for the production of refined sugar and its wax is considered as a potential substitute for the expensive carnauba wax, which is of cosmetic and pharmaceutical interest. Refined sugar is the primary product of sugarcane juice, but during its processing, various other valuable products are also obtained in an unrefined form, such as, brown sugar, molasses, and jaggery. Sugarcane juice is widely used in India in the treatment of jaundice, hemorrhage, dysuria, anuria, and other urinary diseases. Herein, we have summarized the different phytoconstituents and health benefits of sugarcane and its valuable products. The phytochemistry of sugarcane wax (obtained from the leaves and stalks of sugarcane), leaves, juice, and its products has revealed the presence of various fatty acid, alcohol, phytosterols, higher terpenoids, flavonoids, -O- and -C-glycosides, and phenolic acids. The future prospective of some of the sugarcane products has been discussed, which needs a phytopharmacological study and has a great potential to be a valuable medicinal product.

Keywords: Fatty acid; Saccharum officinarum; phenolic acids; phytochemistry.

Conflict of interest statement

Conflict of Interest: None declared

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Processing of sugarcane products
Figure 2
Figure 2
Chemistry of sugarcane wax (a) Long chain saturated fatty alcohols; (b) Long chain saturated fatty acids present in D-003
Figure 3
Figure 3
Chemistry of sugarcane wax (a) Simple phytosterols; (b) Ketosteroids; (c) Hydroxyketosteroids; (d) Higher terpenoids
Figure 4
Figure 4
Phenolic compounds identified from sugarcane juice (a) Phenolic acids; (b) Flavones
Figure 5
Figure 5
Flavone glycosides identified from sugarcane juice (39 – 47) and from sugarcane leaves (39, 40, 46, and 47)
Figure 6
Figure 6
New Flavone glycosides identified from sugarcane juice (48 - 52) and from sugarcane leaves (53, 54)
Figure 7
Figure 7
Phenolic glycosides of the sugarcane product
Figure 8
Figure 8
Chemical constituents of brown sugar (a) Benzoic acid derivatives; (b) Cinnamic acid derivatives; (c) Volatile constituents

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