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Clinical Trial
. 2015;24(4):332-8.
doi: 10.1159/000431035. Epub 2015 May 27.

Are Growing Pains Related to Vitamin D Deficiency? Efficacy of Vitamin D Therapy for Resolution of Symptoms

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Free PMC article
Clinical Trial

Are Growing Pains Related to Vitamin D Deficiency? Efficacy of Vitamin D Therapy for Resolution of Symptoms

Aysel Vehapoglu et al. Med Princ Pract. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status of children with growing pains and to evaluate the efficacy of vitamin D treatment on the resolution of pain symptoms.

Subjects and methods: One hundred and twenty children with growing pains were included in a prospective cohort study. Serum 25(OH)D and bone mineral levels were measured in all subjects at the time of enrollment. The pain intensity of those with vitamin D deficiency was measured using a pain visual analog scale (VAS). After a single oral dose of vitamin D, the pain intensity was remeasured by means of the VAS at 3 months. The 25(OH)D levels and VAS scores before and after oral vitamin D administration were compared by means of a paired Student's t test.

Results: In the 120 children with growing pains, vitamin D insufficiency was noted in 104 (86.6%). Following vitamin D supplementation, the mean 25(OH)D levels increased from 13.4 ± 7.2 to 44.5 ± 16.4 ng/ml, the mean pain VAS score decreased from 6.8 ± 1.9 to 2.9 ± 2.5 cm (a mean reduction of -3.8 ± 2.1, p < 0.001) and the difference was statistically significant.

Conclusion: Supplementation with oral vitamin D resulted in a significant reduction in pain intensity among these children with growing pains who had hypovitaminosis D.

Figures

Fig. 1
Fig. 1
25(OH)D levels observed at the baseline and after 1 month of supplementation of vitamin D in the study group. The data are expressed as mean values. Δ difference: 33.24 ± 16.5. A paired Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. p < 0.05.
Fig. 2
Fig. 2
VAS of the children with growing pains at the baseline and after 3 months. The data are expressed as mean values. Δ difference: −3.8 ± 2.1. A paired Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. p < 0.05.

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