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, 27 (6), 1851-4

Effects of Cervical Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glide on Forward Head Posture and Respiratory Function

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Effects of Cervical Sustained Natural Apophyseal Glide on Forward Head Posture and Respiratory Function

Se-Yoon Kim et al. J Phys Ther Sci.

Abstract

[Purpose] To determine the effects of cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide on forward head posture and respiratory function. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty male and female adults in their 20s with forward head posture were included in the study. The subjects were divided randomly into experimental and control groups (n=15 each). Subjects in the experimental group performed cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide three times/week for four weeks while subjects in the control group did not perform the intervention. The craniovertebral angle, forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second, as well as the % predicted value of each measurement were assessed to determine the changes in respiration functions before and after the exercise. [Results] The craniovertebral angle four weeks after the experiment was increased in the experimental group, whereas the control group showed no significant difference compared to baseline. The forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and the % predicted values thereof were significantly increased in the experimental group four weeks after the experiment, but not in the control group. [Conclusion] Cervical sustained natural apophyseal glide was determined to be effective in improving neck posture and respiratory functions for patients with forward head posture.

Keywords: Cervical SNAG; Forward head posture; Respiratory function.

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Cited by 5 PubMed Central articles

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