The Role of Stress in Understanding Differences in Sedentary Behavior in Hispanic/Latino Adults: Results From the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study

J Phys Act Health. 2016 Mar;13(3):310-7. doi: 10.1123/jpah.2014-0608. Epub 2015 Jul 14.

Abstract

Background: Chronic stress and/or lifetime traumatic stress can create a self-reinforcing cycle of unhealthy behaviors, such as overeating and sedentary behavior, that can lead to further increases in stress. This study examined the relationship between stress and sedentary behavior in a sample of Hispanic/Latino adults (N = 4244) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study.

Methods: Stress was measured as the number of ongoing difficulties lasting 6 months or more and as lifetime exposure to traumatic events. Sedentary behavior was measured by self-report and with accelerometer. Multivariable regression models examined associations of stress measures with time spent in sedentary behaviors adjusting by potential confounders.

Results: Those who reported more than one chronic stressor spent, on average, 8 to 10 additional minutes per day in objectively measured sedentary activities (P < .05), whereas those with more than one lifetime traumatic stressor spent (after we adjusted for confounders) 10 to 14 additional minutes in sedentary activities (P < .01) compared with those who did not report any stressors. Statistical interactions between the 2 stress measures and age or sex were not significant.

Conclusion: Interventions aimed at reducing sedentary behaviors might consider incorporating stress reduction into their approaches.

Publication types

  • Evaluation Study
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

MeSH terms

  • Accelerometry
  • Adolescent
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • California / epidemiology
  • Chronic Disease / ethnology
  • Female
  • Health Behavior / ethnology
  • Hispanic Americans / psychology*
  • Hispanic Americans / statistics & numerical data
  • Humans
  • Life Change Events*
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Risk Factors
  • Sedentary Behavior / ethnology*
  • Self Report
  • Socioeconomic Factors
  • Stress Disorders, Traumatic / ethnology*
  • Stress Disorders, Traumatic / psychology
  • Stress, Psychological / ethnology*
  • Stress, Psychological / psychology
  • Young Adult