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Review
, 2015, 471208

Effects of Kinesio Taping Versus McConnell Taping for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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Review

Effects of Kinesio Taping Versus McConnell Taping for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Wen-Dien Chang et al. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med.

Abstract

Objectives. To conduct a systematic review comparing the effects of Kinesio taping with McConnell taping as a method of conservative management of patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Methods. MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, AMED, and the Cochrane Central Register of Control Trials electronic databases were searched through July 2014. Controlled studies evaluating the effects of Kinesio or McConnell taping in PFPS patients were retrieved. Results. Ninety-one articles were selected from the articles that were retrieved from the databases, and 11 articles were included in the analysis. The methods, evaluations, and results of the articles were collected, and the outcomes of patellar tapings were analyzed. Kinesio taping can reduce pain and increase the muscular flexibility of PFPS patients, and McConnell taping also had effect in pain relief and patellar alignment. Meta-analysis showed small effect in pain reduction and motor function improvement and moderate effect in muscle activity change among PFPS patients using Kinesio taping. Conclusions. Kinesio taping technique used for muscles can relieve pain but cannot change patellar alignment, unlike McConnell taping. Both patellar tapings are used differently for PFPS patients and substantially improve muscle activity, motor function, and quality of life.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
Flowchart of article search.
Figure 2
Figure 2
The applications of Kinesio taping for PFPS patients: white arrow is the sticking aspect, and available tension of tape is used over affected muscle, finishing with no tension. (a) I-shaped Kinesio tape with 50–75% tension is applied as McConnell taping, and the tape is covered with patellar to pull medially. Y-shaped tape with 10–15% tension is applied on quadriceps (b) and VMO muscle (c, d) to improve proprioceptive stimulation and muscle strength. The inverse methods of hamstring muscle covering Y-shaped tape (e) and iliotibial band covering I-shaped tape (f) with 10–15% tension could relieve the muscle tightness. Three Y-shaped tapes are applied to the quadriceps muscle to increase the facilitated tension (g). After finishing muscular tapping, 2 I-shaped tapes are applied around patella for patellar fixation (h).
Figure 3
Figure 3
Pooled estimate of effects in pain with Kinesio taping and McConnell taping.
Figure 4
Figure 4
Pooled estimate of effects in outcome measures.

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