Smoking-Related Beliefs and Susceptibility Among United States Youth Nonsmokers

J Adolesc Health. 2015 Oct;57(4):448-50. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2015.06.016. Epub 2015 Aug 11.

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of the study was to examine racial/ethnic disparities in smoking beliefs and susceptibility in a nationally representative sample of United States youth nonsmokers (N = 21,931).

Methods: Weighted regression models were used to examine smoking-related beliefs and susceptibility by race/ethnicity adjusting for demographics, exposure to pro-tobacco advertising and promotions, parental guidance against tobacco use, and peer norms.

Results: Compared with non-Hispanic whites, racial/ethnic minority youth endorsed pro-smoking beliefs and were susceptible to smoking. Non-Hispanic blacks, non-Hispanic Asians, and Hispanics embraced social benefits of smoking (all p < .05). Hispanics had lower perceptions of tobacco-related risks (adjusted odds ratio = .87) and were more susceptible to smoking (adjusted odds ratio = 1.56). Disparities in smoking beliefs and susceptibility persisted between minority and non-Hispanic white youth after adjusting for exposure to pro-tobacco advertising and promotions, parental guidance against tobacco use, and peer norms.

Conclusions: Smoking-related beliefs and susceptibility varied by race/ethnicity among youth nonsmokers after accounting for known predictors of youth smoking.

Keywords: Adolescents; Racial/ethnic disparities; Smoking susceptibility; Smoking-related beliefs.

Publication types

  • Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

MeSH terms

  • Adolescent
  • Adolescent Behavior / psychology*
  • Attitude to Health
  • Ethnic Groups / statistics & numerical data
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Peer Group
  • Psychology, Adolescent
  • Regression Analysis
  • Smoking / ethnology*
  • Smoking / psychology*
  • Smoking Cessation / ethnology*
  • Smoking Cessation / psychology*
  • Social Perception*
  • United States
  • Young Adult