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Review
, 6 (3), 105-10

Pain Management Following Spinal Surgeries: An Appraisal of the Available Options

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Review

Pain Management Following Spinal Surgeries: An Appraisal of the Available Options

Sukhminder Jit Singh Bajwa et al. J Craniovertebr Junction Spine.

Abstract

Spinal procedures are generally associated with intense pain in the postoperative period, especially for the initial few days. Adequate pain management in this period has been seen to correlate well with improved functional outcome, early ambulation, early discharge, and preventing the development of chronic pain. A diverse array of pharmacological options exists for the effective amelioration of post spinal surgery pain. Each of these drugs possesses inherent advantages and disadvantages which restricts their universal applicability. Therefore, combination therapy or multimodal analgesia for proper control of pain appears as the best approach in this regard. The current manuscript discussed the pathophysiology of postsurgical pain including its nature, the various tools for assessment, and the various pharmacological agents (both conventional and upcoming) available at our disposal to respond to post spinal surgery pain.

Keywords: Hyperalgesia; infusion; intravenous; multimodal analgesia; pain management; pain measurement; spinal surgery.

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