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, 2015, 790838

Studies on the In Vitro Antiproliferative, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition Activities Associated With Chrysanthemum Coronarium Essential Oil

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Studies on the In Vitro Antiproliferative, Antimicrobial, Antioxidant, and Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition Activities Associated With Chrysanthemum Coronarium Essential Oil

Sanaa K Bardaweel et al. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med.

Abstract

The essential oil of the Jordanian Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (garland) was isolated by hydrodistillation from dried flowerheads material. The oil was essayed for its in vitro scavenging activity using the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The results demonstrate that the oil exhibits moderate radical scavenging activity relative to the strong antioxidant ascorbic acid. In addition, cholinesterase inhibitory activity of C. coronarium essential oil was evaluated for the first time. Applying Ellman's colorimetric method, interesting cholinesterase inhibitory activity, which is not dose dependent, was evident for the oil. Furthermore, antimicrobial activities of the oil against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were evaluated. While it fails to inhibit Gram-negative bacteria growth, the antibacterial effects demonstrated by the oil were more pronounced against the Gram-positive strains. Moreover, the examined oil was assessed for its in vitro antiproliferative properties where it demonstrated variable activities towards different human cancer cell lines, of which the colon cancer was the most sensitive to the oil treatment.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1
DPPH radical scavenging activity of Chrysanthemum coronarium essential oil and the positive control ascorbic acid.
Figure 2
Figure 2
AChE inhibitory activity of Chrysanthemum coronarium essential oil and the positive control galantamine.
Figure 3
Figure 3
Antiproliferative activities of Chrysanthemum coronarium essential oil against four human cancer cell lines. Exposure time 48 h. Values are expressed as mean ± SD of three experiments.

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