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Meta-Analysis
. 2015 Sep 15;5:14161.
doi: 10.1038/srep14161.

BMI Affects the Relationship Between Long Chain N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake and Stroke Risk: A Meta-Analysis

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Free PMC article
Meta-Analysis

BMI Affects the Relationship Between Long Chain N-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake and Stroke Risk: A Meta-Analysis

Pengfei Cheng et al. Sci Rep. .
Free PMC article

Abstract

We performed a meta-analysis to clarify the relationship between long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake and stroke risk. Relevant studies were identified by searching online databases through May 2015. Log relative risks (RRs) of the highest versus the lowest for cohort studies were weighed by the inverse variance method to obtain pooled RRs. Fourteen prospective cohort studies including 514,483 individuals and 9,065 strokes were included. The pooled RR of overall stroke risk for long chain n-3 PUFA intake was 0.87 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-0.95]. Stratification analysis showed that higher long chain n-3 PUFAs intake was associated with reduced fatal stroke risk (RR = 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.97), reduced stroke risk for BMI < 24 (RR = 0.86; 95% CI, 0.75-0.98) and reduced stroke risk for females (RR = 0.81; 95% CI, 0.71-0.92), but was not associated with stroke risk for either BMI ≥ 24 or men. This meta-analysis reveals that higher long chain n-3 PUFA intake is inversely associated with risk of stroke morbidity and mortality with BMI and sex as key factors influencing this risk. Individuals should be encouraged to manage their body weight while increasing their intake of long chain n-3 PUFAs.

Conflict of interest statement

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Figures

Figure 1
Figure 1. Flow chart of study selection.
Figure 2
Figure 2. Forest plot of relative risk for long chain n-3 PUFA intake and overall stroke risk.
RR, relative risk.
Figure 3
Figure 3. Forest plot of relative risk for long chain n-3 PUFA intake and fatal stroke risk.
RR, relative risk. Both analysis includes mixed fatal and non-fatal stroke risk.
Figure 4
Figure 4. Forest plot of relative risk for BMI effects in long chain n-3 PUFA intake and stroke risk.
NA, not available; RR, relative risk; BMI, body mass index.
Figure 5
Figure 5. Forest plot of relative risk for long chain n-3 PUFA intake and stroke risk for sex subgroups.
RR, relative risk.
Figure 6
Figure 6. Sensitivity analysis of relative risk for long chain n-3 PUFA intake and stroke risk.
The results remained persistent after applying the leave-one-out method.
Figure 7
Figure 7. Funnel plot showing association of long chain n-3 PUFA intake with stroke risk.

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