Prevalence and Correlates of Depression and Anxiety Among Patients With Tuberculosis at WolaitaSodo University Hospital and Sodo Health Center, WolaitaSodo, South Ethiopia, Cross Sectional Study

BMC Psychiatry. 2015 Sep 14;15:214. doi: 10.1186/s12888-015-0598-3.

Abstract

Background: Anxiety and depression are frequently and highly occurring mental disorders in patients with tuberculosis. When depression and anxiety co-morbid with tuberculosis, it leads to poor adherence to anti TB medication, which is important barrier to global control of tuberculosis & increases the risk of morbidity and mortality due to TB. Cross sectional study was conducted to assess prevalence and correlates of depression and anxiety among patients with TB at WolaitaSodo University Hospital and Sodo Health Center, WolaitaSodo, Ethiopia.

Methods: Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014.A total of 417 TB patients, who had regular follow up at WolaitaSodo University Hospital and Sodo Health Center, WolaitaSodo, South Ethiopia, were recruited to assess depression and anxiety and its associated correlates. Depression and anxiety were assessed through face to face interviews by trained psychiatry nurses using the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS). Correlates for depression and anxiety were assessed using a structured questionnaire, Oslo social support scale and TB stigma Scale.

Results: The prevalence of depression and anxiety among patients with TB were 43.4% (181) and 41.5% (173) respectively. When we adjusted for the effect of potential confounding variables, patients who had co-morbid HIV infection [AOR = 5.90,(95% CI: 2.34,15.93)], poor social support [AOR = 18.06, (95% CI:11.21,25.45)] & perceived TB stigma [AOR = 10.86, (95% CI:10.26,23.47)] were more likely to have depression as compared to individuals who had no co-morbid HIV infection, good social support and no perceived TB stigma respectively. Patients who had co-morbid HIV infection [AOR = 9.61,(95% CI:3.56,25.96)], poor social support [AOR = 8.93,(95% CI: 5.01,15.94)], perceived TB stigma [AOR = 3.11,(95% CI:1.78,5.42)], being female [AOR = 1.72 (95% CI: 1.06, 2.95)], current substance use[AOR = 4.88, (95% CI: 1.79, 13.28)] and being on intensive phase of TB treatment [AOR = 1.91, (95% CI: 1.08, 3.39)] were more likely to have anxiety as compared to individuals who had no co-morbid HIV infection, good social support, no perceived TB stigma, being male and being on continuous phase of TB treatment respectively.

Conclusion: Developing guidelines and training of health workers in TB clinics is useful to screen and treat depression and anxiety among TB patients.

Publication types

  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

MeSH terms

  • Adult
  • Anxiety Disorders / epidemiology
  • Anxiety Disorders / microbiology*
  • Coinfection / epidemiology
  • Coinfection / psychology
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Depressive Disorder / epidemiology
  • Depressive Disorder / microbiology*
  • Ethiopia / epidemiology
  • Female
  • HIV Infections / epidemiology
  • HIV Infections / psychology
  • Hospitals, University
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Prevalence
  • Social Stigma
  • Social Support
  • Substance-Related Disorders / epidemiology
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Tuberculosis / drug therapy
  • Tuberculosis / psychology*